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The Story of Hieno - It’s About YOU

Various studies have shown that our brains recall information much easier when we write notes or draw pictures by hand, especially when using multiple colors. We want to help you to be more creative, remember the notes you have taken and to assist you and your loved ones to perform better at school, work and at course of studies.

Ditch your electrics for a while and release your creativity, learn more effectively and remember better with us!

Hieno was founded at Christmas 2016. The idea was very straightforward from the get-go: we wanted to offer useful, delightful products at a fair price – and at the same time serve our customers from the bottom of our hearts. Our name, Hieno, comes from Scandinavia, where we also originate from. Hieno does not directly translate into English, but it means roughly the same as ”very fine”.  This

word guides us in everything we do. We will do our utmost to make our customers think, “What a Hieno small family business.”

We are super happy to be a part of your journey.

Thank you.

Warm regards, John & Jenny

 

Studies:

 

2. “The color-coding makes it an easier study tool for focusing on vocab or questions or summaries. For the kids who continue to try and continue to work on it, [the notes] are a skill that goes on to help them be successful at the next level. The point is to teach people how to learn something. That skill is transcendent; that is the thing you take with you.”

Source: https://vikingvanguard.com/uncategorized/2017/11/02/do-color-coded-notes-work/

 

3. “Using simple words and pictures helps us to see connections between pieces of information.”

Source: https://qz.com/676557/the-scientific-case-for-doodling-while-taking-notes/

 

4. “Color coding your notes will facilitate the perception by your brain. The brain then can easily retrieve the notes, due to this significant technique. In short, it positively affects concept learning and serves memory function reviewing.”

Source: https://www.fatimahachem.com/6-reasons-why-note-taking-is-very-important/

 

5. "When we write by hand, we have to coordinate verbal and fine movement systems," Dr Helen Macpherson of the Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN) at Deakin University told The Huffington Post Australia. "And when we learn new information, for example at school or in a university lecture, we don’t write verbatim, which means we have to create our own summaries and concepts.”

 

6. “While notes by hand help people retain and conceptualize information more accurately, there are a host of other benefits. Writing by hand soothes people. Cursive connects the left and right side of the brain, and for young children, handwriting boosts cognitive skills that technology-aided writing doesn't. For older people, it keeps the mind sharp and some psychologists even believe it improves memory over time.”

Source: http://www.genuinecuriosity.com/genuinecuriosity/2016/2/13/the-benefits-of-writing-by-hand

 

7. “When you’re feeling sad or stressed, sometimes materializing your thoughts by writing them out can be an amazing therapy.Writing by hand, particularly in cursive, is rhythmic, so it helps your erratic thoughts get in a calming flow.And since you connect to words more when you write them out, you can also process a problem more easily when you put it to paper.”

Source: https://www.littlethings.com/benefits-of-writing-by-hand/

 

8. “A 2009 study from the University of Washington seems to support Sontag, Capote, and many other writers' preference for writing by hand: Elementary school students who wrote essays with a pen not only wrote more than their keyboard-tapping peers, but they also wrote faster and in more complete sentences. “

Source: http://mentalfloss.com/article/33508/4-benefits-writing-hand

 

9. “Handwritten notes also facilitate the organic process — it’s easier to think outside the box when you can write outside the lines.”

Source: https://www.staples.com/sbd/cre/tech-services/explore-tips-and-advice/tech-articles/why-taking-notes-by-hand-reaps-business-benefits.html 

 

10. Emphasizes and organizes information. As you take notes, you’ll decide on and highlight the key ideas you hear, identifying the structure of a class presentation. You’ll also be able to indicate the supporting points of a presentation, making study and understanding easier after class. Such organized notes also make it easier for you to link classroom learning to textbook readings.

Source: https://sites.austincc.edu/student-skills-workshops/taking-effective-notes/benefits-of-notetaking/

 

11. “Handwriting is a complex task which requires various skills – feeling the pen and paper, moving the writing implement, and directing movement by thought,” says Edouard Gentaz, professor of developmental psychology at the University of Geneva. “Children take several years to master this precise motor exercise: you need to hold the scripting tool firmly while moving it in such a way as to leave a different mark for each letter.”

Source: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/dec/16/cognitive-benefits-handwriting-decline-typing

 

12. Yet scientists are discovering that learning cursive is an important tool for cognitive development, particularly in training the brain to learn “functional specialization”[2]—that is, the capacity for optimal efficiency. In the case of learning cursive writing, the brain develops functional specialization that integrates both sensation, movement control, and thinking. Brain imaging studies reveal that multiple areas of brain become co-activated during the learning of cursive writing of pseudo-letters, as opposed to typing or just visual practice.

Source: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/memory-medic/201303/why-writing-hand-could-make-you-smarter

 

13. "When we write, a unique neural circuit is automatically activated," he said. "There is a core recognition of the gesture in the written word, a sort of recognition by mental simulation in your brain, it seems that this circuit is contributing in unique ways we didn't realize." The results? “Learning is made easier" as French psychologist Stanislas Dehaene told The New York Times,

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/handwriting-helps-you-learn-2014-12


14. Twenty years ago, cognitive psychologist Robert Bjork called this phenomenon “desirable difficulty,” the idea that making learning harder can help information stick. If teachers required students to take their own notes or (on top of that) requested that they handwrite them, students could perform better on tests—and they might even feel empowered to be more creative throughout the learning process, too. Some combination of handwritten and typed notes could also expedite the learning process and illustrate the power of engaging with material in more ways than one.

Source: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/next/body/taking-notes-by-hand-could-improve-memory-wt/